Flip-Discs

Flip-Discs

Installation: 2012   |   Product: 2016

Flip-Discs is a display technology made up of 12mm plastic discs that physically flip at up to 40 frames-per-second from one colored side to another, making a small sound as they flip. The piece of software developed, called Particles, allows people to see themselves on the display, as well as interact with graphics on the screen.

The first version of Flip-Discs was created by BREAKFAST in 2011, originally called the Electromagnet Dot Display, and pushed the vintage Flip-Dot technology from the1960s to 18 frames-per-second. In 2017, BREAKFAST redeveloped the technology from the ground up, creating the first off-the-shelf kinetic display available for purchase via 17”x17” modules.

Flip-Discs current installations include:

  • Playground Global - Palo Alto, CA
  • Little Caesar’s Arena - Detroit, MI
  • MiniGrow - New York, NY
  • 555 Peachtree - Atlanta, GA
  • Undisclosed - Jacksonville, FL

 

Points

Points

2013
Patented, Product

Points is a kinetic directional sign whose arms rotate to display events, information, and highlighted locations in the nearby area.

It was conceived in response to the significant movement of cities around the world adopting large touch screens, which inevitably resort to being digital ad platforms more so than useful information sources. We felt there was a better way to serve up useful, time-relevant data in a more pleasing and timeless way.

Points is patented technology. BREAKFAST is not currently taking new orders, but you may sign up to be contacted with any updates.

Mission Control

Mission Control

2013
Installation

Mission Control is an interactive installation inspired by the Apollo-era NASA Mission Control room and designed to create an enjoyable way to explore the significant amount of data that exists throughout Major League Baseball. It was installed at the MLB Fan Cave in New York, NY.

The installation featured 24 displays representing each team/stadium. By default, a view of the field or a live stream of the game happening at that field would be on each display. The control panel featured 28 toggle switches which would display real-time or historical data for each team. The center panel also featured lights and dials displaying current activity or stats from a game or season.

At the center was a large display that also acted as a broadcasting station activated by a key switch.